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1. Nonpayment for Private Gig
Highest Court Superior Court of Connecticut
Year Ended 2005
Plaintiffs Promoter(s)
Defendants Bennett, Tony
Talent Agent(s)
Other No Other parties on file
Short Description Plaintiff entered into a contract with Defendant to have Tony Bennett perform at a private party in New Haven, Connecticut, for the sum of $250,000. Despite this contract, Defendant entered into another agreement with Creative Artists Agency to have Tony Bennett perform at the private party for $200,000. Plaintiff subsequently sued for breach of contract. The court struck down Defendant's cross-complaint, which alleged that Plaintiff induced the breach of contract himself. - SKR


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2. "The Man" vs. 2 Live Crew (IV)
Highest Court Fifth Circuit
Year Ended 2004
Plaintiffs 2 Live Crew
Concert Attendee(s)
Promoter(s)
Defendants County Entity and/or Official(s)
Other No Other parties on file
Short Description Rap group members, individual concert-goers, and concert promoters sued a sheriff's department for violation of First, Fourth, and Fourteenth amendment rights when the sheriffs set up road blocks and checkpoints outside of a concert planned in Mississippi. The court granted qualified immunity to the sheriffs on some, but not all of the constitutional claims. While several opening acts are reported to have performed, 2 Live Crew did not perform at the Mississippi concert. - SKR


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3. Injured at an Alabama Gig
Highest Court Supreme Court of Alabama
Year Ended 1994
Plaintiffs Concert Attendee(s)
Defendants Proprietor(s)
Other Alabama
Nonprofit Organization(s)
Promoter(s)
Short Description While attending the "Alabama June Jam," a concert put on by the rock band Alabama, Plaintiff slipped on a speed-bump and injured herself. However, she only sued the owner of the premises, who had leased the land "as is" to the band. The court found that Defendant did not owe any duty to Plaintiff other than to alert Plaintiff of dangerous conditions known to Defendant that were not easily discoverable or obvious to others. Plaintiff's action dismissed for both reasons. - LSW


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4. Injured by Aerosmith's Crazy Fans
Highest Court S.D. New York
Year Ended 1989
Plaintiffs Concert Attendee(s)
Defendants Aerosmith
Madison Square Garden
Promoter(s)
Warner Bros. Records
Other No Other parties on file
Short Description Plaintiff, a woman that was punched in the nose during an Aerosmith concert at Madison Square Garden, sued the band, their record label, the venue, and others for willfully attracting "crazies" to the concert who were prone to violence. The parties settled outside of court, but only on the condition that Defendants could still pursue sanctions in court for Plaintiff bringing such a frivolous action. In the proceeding that followed, Plaintiff's counsel narrowly avoided being sanctioned by the court for bringing the case, saved only by equally ridiculous cases elsewhere (like Ozzy getting sued for fans' suicides) which provided some sliver of reasonableness to Plaintiff's accusations. - SKR & LSW


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5. Charity Concert Complications
Highest Court District of Columbia Circuit
Year Ended 1987
Plaintiffs Promoter(s)
Defendants Beach Boys
Brother Records
Nonprofit Organization(s)
Other No Other parties on file
Short Description The promoter of a benefit concert sued the Beach Boys for breach of contract, attempting to bring the action as a criminal "qui tam" proceeding under the False Claims Act. The court entered judgment for the Beach Boys, granting their motion to dismiss Plaintiff's complaint, saying it failed to state a claim on which relief could be granted; there was no cognizable relation between the Boys' alleged misrepresentation and the expenditure of government funds, which was required for Plaintiff's action to survive pre-trial motions. - LSW & SKR


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6. Injured at the Opry
Highest Court Supreme Court of Michigan
Year Ended 1963
Plaintiffs Concert Attendee(s)
Defendants Acuff, Roy
Cash, Johnny
Grand Ole Opry
Miller, Roger
Promoter(s)
Other No Other parties on file
Short Description Attendee of the "Grand Ole Opry," in Saginaw, Michigan, was injured at the concert and sued the company that owns the trademark, as well as performers in the show, alleging they were agents of the Defendant corporation. Personal jurisdiction as to all was denied: Defendant corporation had not "done business" in the St. for general jurisdiction, but had only allowed a local entity to use the trademarked name, and the performers, including Johnny Cash, Roy Acuff, and Roger Miller, were not agents of the corporation. - LSW


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