box1 header1
Search Results
Search Results 8 results
Showing Records 1 - 8
Showing Page 1 of 1
Options Conduct New Search
 
1. Ex-Girlfriend vs. 50 Cent
Highest Court New York Supreme Court
Year Ended 2008
Plaintiffs Girlfriend of Artist(s)
Defendants 50 Cent
Other No Other parties on file
Short Description A longtime girlfriend to Curtis Jackson (50 Cent), who is also mother to his child, sued 50 for numerous causes of action after he "made it big," alleging he had earlier promised, in return for supporting him while he was struggling and newly paroled, that "when he makes it big, he will take care of [her] for the rest of [her] life." When 50's celebrity and bank account grew, he pushed for Plaintiff (and provided funds) to start a career investing in properties. After the relationship strained, 50 began sleeping around and allegedly hitting Plaintiff, they split, and Plaintiff filed this suit. It could be taught in first year Contracts classes, as it deals with oral contracts and equitable relief that may arise when such promises are unenforceable. The trial court found that Plaintiff stated causes of action for breach of contract, breach of joint venture agreement, partition of property, and various equitable actions, holding that unmarried cohabitants were legally able to contract regarding financial matters. In its final disposition, however, the court dismissed the complaint in its entirety. Any contract-based claims were blocked by lack of specificity in the original promise or by the Statute of Frauds, as not performable within one year. The court found for 50 Cent on every other cause of action, denying petition of property and dismissing assault and battery (outside the statute of limitations), fraud, and others. Plaintiff's "unjust enrichment" action was also insufficient; 50 had since taken care of Plaintiff, even if she originally took care of him. - LSW


view more detail
 
2. Gene Simmons's Ex Sues
Highest Court New York Supreme Court
Year Ended 2005
Plaintiffs Girlfriend of Artist(s)
Defendants Simmons, Gene
Viacom
Other KISS
Short Description Plaintiff, now married, was a former sexual and romantic partner of Gene Simmons, lead singer for the glam/metal/theatrical rock act KISS, prior to and after formation of the band. Plaintiff sued various television entities for defamation and violation of her right of publicity when her relationship with Simmons was portrayed in a VH-1 documentary about the band. The caption for the segment in which she appeared was "24 Hour Whore" (classy, VH-1, classy), though this comment was intended to implicate Simmons as the whore, not Plaintiff. Plaintiff's photograph was shown on screen while Simmons discussed his promiscuity, sleeping with any woman, no "matter who they were, what size, shape or anything." The court denied Defendants' motion to dismiss, saying the feature was susceptible to defamatory meaning. Simmons' promiscuity could certainly be imputed by viewers onto Plaintiff (and even if not, it certainly made her seem "unchaste"). Regarding Plaintiff's publicity claim, however, the court found Defendants' use of her likeness was not "for advertising purposes," and thus the claim was dismissed. - LSW


view more detail
 
3. Prince's Ex Sells Princes Stuff
Highest Court California Court of Appeal
Year Ended 2004
Plaintiffs Girlfriend of Artist(s)
Defendants Lawyer(s)
Prince
Other No Other parties on file
Short Description In 1991, the Plaintiff had a romantic relationship with Prince, who gave her some items as gifts. Ten years later, the Plaintiff approached a broker to sell the items at auction. The broker refused the auction after being told by Prince's attorney that the items were stolen. The Plaintiff sued for defamation, tortious interference with contract, and inflictions of emotional distress. The letter accused whomever had the items of receiving them via fraud or theft. The letter did not explicitly name the Plaintiff, who claimed that employees at the auction house began treating her like a criminal. The court found that there was a question as to whether the letter defamed the Plaintiff, allowing the claim to go to trial. The appellate court also allowed the Plaintiff's tortious interference claim to proceed. Prince's lawyer should have known that there was a contract between the auction house and the Plaintiff because of her prior experiences in dealing with people trying to seal items purportedly tied to Prince. By sending the letter, the attorney interfered with the actual auction. As to the intentional infliction of emotional distress, the Plaintiff needed to show that the conduct was beyond all bounds of decency. The Court dismissed her claim because it did not find the letter so ridiculous, based upon the concern of the attorney who represented an intensely private man like Prince. Further, the Court found that the Plaintiff did a poor job of explaining the harm she suffered, intermingling events during her relationship with Prince. - JMC


view more detail
 
4. Prince Paul's Custody Battle
Highest Court New York Supreme Court, Appellate Division
Year Ended 1998
Plaintiffs Prince Paul
Defendants Girlfriend of Artist(s)
Other No Other parties on file
Short Description Prince Paul, originally from the band Stetsasonic but more recently known for his production work (such as Chris Rock's novelty hit "No Sex (In the Champagne Room)"), had a child with Defendant, Nichelle Jones, who maintained prime custody, even though Paul was active, along with his family, in the child's life. Paul was also the main "bread-winner," given his musical successes. When Jones tried to move from the jurisdiction, the court held that, given the role Paul has played in the child's life, it would not be in the child's best interest to be relocated, and thus if Jones tries to do so, Paul would receive custody. In later interviews, Prince Paul referenced this situation as a bad omen at a time when his career was also a bit in the air. - LSW


view more detail
 
5. Pendergrass Owes Ex's Estate? (II)
Highest Court Superior Court of Pennsylvania
Year Ended 1986
Plaintiffs Estate of Music Manager(s)
Defendants CBS Records
Pendergrass, Teddy
Other Girlfriend of Artist(s)
Short Description After unsuccessfully joining this suit to her own bankruptcy proceeding (see "Pendergrass Owes Ex's Estate? (I)"), Plaintiff sued Teddy Pendergrass in state court, alleging he had not paid 10% of royalties received according to a management contract between Pendergrass and Plaintiff's child, Teddy's former manager. Finding that continually-missed payments constitute a continuing wrong, the court held Plaintiff's claim not necessarily barred by laches, thus reversing the lower court's decision for Defendant on the issue. - LSW


view more detail
 
6. Pendergrass Owes Ex's Estate? (I)
Highest Court E.D. Pennsylvania
Year Ended 1985
Plaintiffs Estate of Music Manager(s)
Defendants Pendergrass, Teddy
Other Girlfriend of Artist(s)
Short Description Plaintiff is the executor and sole heir of one Taazmaiya Lang, former manager for Teddy Pendergrass (and perhaps his girlfriend), who was unfortunately murdered before this action. Plaintiff is experiencing personal bankruptcy proceedings, and brought suit on behalf of Lang alleging Pendergrass did not pay according to the management contract they'd signed. The bankruptcy court held the action against Pendergrass was not within the its bankruptcy jurisdiction, which only pertained to Plaintiff's claims, while the action against Pendergrass pertained to the decedent's estate. Plaintiff later brought the claims in state court ("Pendergrass Owes Ex's Estate? (II)"). - LSW


view more detail
 
7. Frampton's Ex Sues After Break-Up
Highest Court New York Supreme Court, Appellate Division
Year Ended 1981
Plaintiffs Girlfriend of Artist(s)
Defendants Frampton, Peter
Other No Other parties on file
Short Description Plaintiff was married to the manager for Humble Pie, the British group founded by members of The Small Faces, The Herd, and Spooky Tooth, during the early 1970s. In 1972, Peter Frampton, the group's guitarist--well-known for his massive 1976 album "Frampton Comes Alive" (cleverly referenced in Wayne's World)--asked Plaintiff to leave her husband and become his lover. She did so, and joined Frampton shortly before his solo career really took off, allegedly according to an oral contract that she would managehis affairs and the two would remain "equal partners." After dissolution of their relationship in 1978, Plaintiff sued Frampton for violating the oral contract, alleging breach, unjust enrichment, and associated actions, requesting various forms of relief. Defendant denied the existed of any professional agreement, and, further, argued it would violate public policy, because consideration for the agreement was an illicit and adulterous sexual relationship, and it was invalid under the Statute of Frauds. The trial court found for Defendant on the first point, finding the contract was founded on sexual favors only, but that the Statute of Frauds may not be applicable to partnership formations. On appeal, the appellate division reversed. Issues of fact remained as to whether Plaintiff's role in Frampton's life was purely personal, or whether she was, as she insisted, also his professional advisor and manager. If the latter, then sexual relations would not be the only consideration for their alleged agreement. The dismissal of her unjust enrichment claim regarding future earnings, however, was affirmed. - LSW


view more detail
 
8. Elvis & Ex Defamatory "Rendezvous"
Highest Court Fifth Circuit
Year Ended 1980
Plaintiffs Girlfriend of Artist(s)
Individual(s)
Defendants Newspaper Publisher(s)
Other Presley, Elvis
Short Description In an interesting case discussing libel laws and public figures, Anita Wood and Johnny Brewer sued the publishers of "People," when it featured a column insinuated Wood had a sexual encounter with Elvis Presley in 1972. Wood had once been a popular singer who had an earlier fling with Presley, and Brewer was her husband, a former Ole Miss football star. The article said Wood and Brewer were divorced, which was untrue. A jury initially found in their favor for over $800,000, but the appellate court reconsidered and held the First Amendment barred recovery. Wood, even though less famous now, was still a public figure regarding her connection to Elvis, and no "malice," or knowledge of/reckless disregard for falsity had been proven. Plaintiff had not proved malice with "convincing clarity." - LSW


view more detail
 
< prev 1 next >